Purple Passion; A Tiny Life

Cycles of Life and Death- two sides of the same coin

My painting, a dead wasp amidst the joyous yellows and purples of fallen jacaranda flowers, reflects the wonder I feel on observing nature and the world around me – the joy of the immensity and yet the minuteness of Life! 

www.facebook.com/100063632527765/posts/pfbid02C9qRLLtD3Uj7HKwtZbfrBEPnoKJSzZSU8FYf8CXU3WKbn1oNREsCQRx27YyyAfGBl/

A poem by friend Terry Dawson, who has the perfect words that encapsulate my painting perfectly!

Amid the purples and the mauves
That please our human eyes
A little life that’s run its course
First crumples then it dies
.”
Terry Dawson

Detail from my larger painting
Lin Barrie, ”Dead Wasp and Jacaranda Landscape”,
acrylic on canvas 4 x 3 feet
Detail from the painting
Posted in abstract art, Africa, African flora, african trees, african wildlife, art, art exhibition, bio diversity, citizen science, climate change, conservation, Cycle of Life, drawing, eco-tourism, ecosystem, environment, flowers, gardens, gardens and flowers, Harare, insects, landscape, landscapes, Life Drawing, Lin Barrie Art, predators, prey, rewilding, Uncategorized, zimbabwe, Zimbabwe artists, Zimbabwean Artist, zimbabweanart | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Elephant Translocation; Snare Wire Art!!!

What do Elephant Translocation and Snare Wire Art have in common?! A lot, if you are an artist in Zimbabwe with a profound vision of the natural world and if you use that vision to create a life size African elephant from trash objects and repurposed snare wire!!!

Johnson Zuze master wire and found objects artist… with the elephant in the room!!


Working from his home in Chitungwiza, Harare, and specializing in Found Objects Art, master artist Johnson Zuze laboured many months in creating this mammoth sculpture, (with frequent deliveries of snare wire from me- wire we collect during anti-poaching operations at Senuko Ranch in the Save Valley Conservancy)

Part of my snare wire collection- on the wall in my art studio

The Elephant in the room was how to move and use this mammoth created from a fascinating array of found objects- treasure from trash!!…

Treasure from trash! Some of the found objects used in the elephant…

The translocation first phase was a flat bed truck to winch and move the behemoth from the tight dusty streets of Chitungwiza to the potholed but leafy streets of Emerald Hill suburb – Daryl Nero’s old house -where the gentle giant stood for the opening of our exhibition, Memories and Musings…

At our Exhibition, Memories and Musings, The elephant in the room becomes the elephant in the garden

The jewelled tusks of this mighty mammoth are a joy, but also a statement- the desirability of tusks in the illegal wildlife trade is ongoing-

Jewelled tusk

Translocation second phase was another trek across H-town to the next even more leafy but still potholed suburb of Kambanje – into the well treed grounds of Amanzi Lodge!

Amanzi Lodge – an outdoor delight in great gardens- be sure to spot the elephant in the garden ….?!

And yet another translocation is due to take place in July 2022…!!

Lin Barrie, Elephant, acrylic on canvas, a very large panting but not quite life size…..!!!


This time the translocation will be of real live elephants from the Save Valley Conservancy (SVC) to the Sapi Safari Area – watch this space for more on that as it rolls out over the next weeks.

SVC currently has many elephants after successful and groundbreaking translocations into Save Valley of a few elephant families from Gonarezhou during drought years in 1992 and 1993 – that success story has become a challenge as our elephants thrive and we need more space for them. So hopefully Sapi will be a wonderful new home for them to find that space…

Baobab reflections in the Save Valley Conservancy, Senuko Ranch

Great Plains Conservation have a lease with Zimbabwe National Parks to manage the Sapi area- and we all look forward to a positive future for communities and conservation in Zimbabwe!

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

A new broom sweeps clean; mark-making as it goes….

Progressions towards a bigger picture, thinking about fire, the cleansing power of it, the rebirth after it, the ‘sweeping clean’ of it.


Working on ‘sweeping clean” -a handmade African broom is a satisfying tool to clean my canvas and then to create tinders, black and white and gold sparks like calligraphy or graffiti which is then semi-obliterated by the action of the grass broom…. www.facebook.com/100063632527765/posts/435176581946756/

  • Sparks, golden calligraphy tracing the trials of life, the marks we leave…
a grass broom – a satisfying paintbrush …
Clay pot and grassbroom – handmade art, craft, culture

The shadows on my studio wall inspire my mark making

Grass Broom Shadows on the wall in my studio

A new broom sweeps clean……..

Watch this space! here it is finished…

Lin Barrie, Burnt Offerings, acrylic on canvas, 4×3 feet

Lin Barrie, Burnt Offerings, acrylic on canvas, 4×3 feet

This huge painting envisioned in an interior….

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Successful Translocation of African wild dog Pups; Zimbabwe to North Carolina

African wild dogs have been translocated all over Southern Africa in increased efforts to re-introduce these predators into their traditional ranges where they have gone extinct or been unduly pressured.

A chance to increase survival potential of this charismatic endangered species.

Painted Dog Conservation relocated a pack that had threatened by rural commuities in Hwange to Mana Pools, but competition and pressure by hyena and lion seemed to prevail angst this particular dogs who rapidly dispersed far and wide..all a learning curve which is inevitable in mans attempt to find solutions for managing the endangered animals in our care…

Recently the celebrated re-inroduction of wild dogs into Gorongosa National Park caught my eye…

as also the introduction of wild dogs into Madikwe Safari Area of South Africa a few years ago….

plus the recent EWT introduction of Lycaon pictus into Malalwi, sponsored in part by Painted Wolf Wines- see more detail on that below…

Meanwhile, I have effected my own “Wild Dog Translocation”, from their home on the wall at Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge, via Altair to Harare, then via DHL to North Carolina. My three wild dog puppies travelled in style and were very well behaved, adapting successfully to their new home….. !!

Lin Barrie Art, “Three Pups”, acrylic on stretched canvas, 2 x 2 feet

three pups translocated from Gonarezhou, via the Save Valley Conservancy, in Zimbabwe, to North Carolina in America!

In a wonderful display of conservation and community support, Giles Raynor of AltAir kindly volunteered to airlift the three pups, (suitably protected!), from Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge on the edge of Gonarezhou National Park, to Harare, from where DHL kindly continued shipping them to a happy receiver in North Carolina, America!

Giles of Altair successfully delivers the translocated wild dog pups into Charles Prince airfield, Harare, on the beginning of their long journey to North carolina…

More on a recent ‘real’ wild dog translocation…excerpt from Africa Parks news….
Blantyre, Malawi: 
On 27 July 2021, 14 African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) were translocated successfully from South Africa and Mozambique to Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve, in an historic project to reintroduce this Endangered species to Malawi. The translocation was undertaken through a collaboration between the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT) and African Parks, which manages Liwonde and Majete protected areas in partnership with Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW). While helping to repopulate both parks, the reintroduction represents a major international effort to conserve African Wild Dogs, with only 6,600 individuals, or just 700 breeding pairs estimated to be left on the continent.

“The Wild Dog is one of Africa’s most Endangered mammals, so we’re extremely proud to have been able to establish safe spaces in Malawi where their long-term survival can be assured”, said the Director of Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Brighton Kumchedwa. “The conservation of our country’s natural heritage is central to our national development strategy. Over the past two decades, our collaboration with African Parks and local communities has helped to restore multiple iconic species to our protected areas, contributing not only to meeting global biodiversity targets but to sustainable economic growth”.  

The African Wild Dogs were sourced from Gorongosa National Park and Karingani Game Reserve in Mozambique, and Somkhanda Community Game Reserve and Maremani Nature Reserve in South Africa. On July 27th, all 14 animals were flown in a single aircraft from Mozambique’s Massingir Airport to Blantyre in Malawi. Eight were released into bomas in Liwonde National Park and six into bomas in Majete Wildlife Reserve, where they will remain for several weeks, allowing them to adjust to the new conditions before being fully released into the wider park areas. Each pack has been fitted with a mix of satellite and radio collars to facilitate the continual monitoring of their location and habitat use and ensure their long-term protection in the parks. 

The DNPW and African Parks partnered in 2003 to manage Majete Wildlife Reserve and subsequently, in 2015, to manage Liwonde National Park, investing significantly in realising the ecological and economic potential of both parks. “Malawi has emerged as a leader in conservation through its progressive actions to revitalise its parks. Over the course of our 18-year partnership with the Malawian Government, we’ve translocated more than 4,000 animals of key species as part of our efforts to create secure, diverse wildlife sanctuaries that can provide a source of long-term socio-economic benefits for people. Wild Dogs are the latest apex carnivore to be reintroduced to Majete and Liwonde, where they will not only positively impact these ecosystems and their tourism potential, but also the survival of this critically threatened species in Africa” said African Parks’ Country Representative Samuel Kamoto.

Since 1998, the Endangered Wildlife Trust’s African Wild Dog Range Expansion Project, with guidance from the Wild Dog Advisory Group, has implemented reintroductions of African Wild Dogs across southern Africa. This project has dramatically increased Wild Dog safe space, pack numbers, population numbers, and genetic diversity. The EWT’s Carnivore Conservation Programme Coordinator, Cole du Plessis, reflects on the complexity of conserving African Wild Dogs. “They are a highly social species that require extensive space and are subject to several human-induced threats. With so few individuals of this species remaining, active work is required to reverse the declining trend by addressing the common threats (snaring, deliberate persecution and disease), intensive monitoring, conducting research projects, strengthening policy, creating awareness, and continually developing best management practice guidelines”. 

Collective conservation efforts, including reintroductions into feasible, safe, protected areas, are crucial to enabling the African Wild Dog population to grow and thrive. This translocation was possible thanks to the core support of Remembering Wildlife’s new book Remembering African Wild Dogs, with additional support from Painted Wolf Wines, Tania Ihlenfeldt and Rob Hibbert, and The OAK Foundation. It would also not have been possible without the support of operational partners:

Administração Nacional das Áreas de Conservação, the Bateleurs, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, Gorongosa National Park, Green Dogs Conservation, the Karingani Game Reserve, the Department of Economic Development Environment and Tourism (LEDET), Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife, Maremani Game Reserve, Mozambique Wildlife Alliance, Somkhanda Community Game Reserve (Wildlands), UmPhafa Private Nature Reserve, and Wildlife ACT.

Posted in adventure travel, aeroplane, Aeroplane art, Africa, Africa Parks, African child, African Safari, African wild dogs, african wildlife, african wildlife conservation fund, aircraft, animal rights, art, art collaboration, bio diversity, bush camps, Chilo Gorge, Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge, citizen science, community conservation, eco-tourism, Flying Safaris, Gonarezhou Conservation Trust, gonarezhou national park, great limpopo transfrontier conservation Area, Harare, landscape, landscapes, Lin Barrie Art, lowveld, Painted Dogs, painted Dogs, Painted Wolf Wines, painted wolves, paintings, predators, puppies, pups, rewilding, safari, Save Valley Conservancy, travel | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bright Skies and Waterlilies; New Year, New Hope….

Bright Skies and Waterlilies…. Wonderful soaking rains in Harare have filled our dams at Borrowdale Brooke Estate and rejuvenated our gardens. A New Year and New Hope. 

Borrowdale Brooke is filling our dams!

Bright skies behind palms start our day as we walk …

Kelli – my daily delightful daughterly inspiration

And the sun peeps through …

Early morning walks are a lesson in Reflections…this sky and water symphony on our walk remind me of Dulux Colour of The Year for 2022, which I have fallen in love with, called “Bright Skies”!…..and which is inspiration for the wall murals that a group of artists will create at the cancer centre in Harare…

Reflections

Dreamy, delicious; Dulux “Bright Skies” radiates hope, calm and healing….

As we walk through Borrowdale Brooke, bright skies frame the flowers that I photograph, in perfect balance and harmony…

Datura, a moonflower, deadly poisonous but exquisite against a ‘bright sky’…..!

and a hymn of sunlit tree silhouettes is ours…an ode to the rising sun….

“Morning has Broken,

Like the first Morning….”

Acacia trees, Sunlit silhouettes

From the sun side of these very same trees, (at the entrance to the Brooke Estate), these glowing golden beauties are framed by a summer sky..

Acacia trees in Borrowdale Brooke Estate

Beauty glows in every blade of grass at our feet

Green green green

The ‘bright skies’ above us, the green wetland around, and a perfect pink rose, dewy in the early morning light, brings to mind our latest project-

Lin Barrie photo, early morning rose… Think Pink!

….a large and growing group of artists and cancer survivors are working with Debi Jeans of The Pink Project, and Sophie Banks, Interior designer, to paint the walls of the Cancer Association Centre in Harare… ably helped by Junior and Linda of the cancer centre.

Maureen Cox, such an inspiration for us all in this endeavour, was former Bookkeeper and General Manager for the Cancer Association of Zimbabwe and sadly succumbed to breast cancer in 2020.
She served as an employee for the Cancer Association for 10 years and offered her services as a volunteer thereafter. She was a highly valuable and respected team member. Her work will not be forgotten.

We will keep a list of various artists/ sponsors but will emphasize that it’s by no means a comprehensive list as many more volunteers/patients sponsors/artists will join as we go along – and whether we donate one hour or two months; one paintbrush or a whole bucket full of hardware, each donation no matter how small is filled with the same amount of love as every other donation

As we walk, looking for waterlilies in the dams of the Brooke as inspiration for the massage room at the Cancer Centre which is our allocated room to decorate, I think back to my memories of last years rainy season in Gonarezhou National Park, (my ‘other home’)…the mellow blue of Tembweharta Pan and the multitudinous white waterlilies which were food for my soul… bright skies indeed..

Lin Barrie photo, Gonarezhou, the mellow blue of Tembweharta Pan and white waterlilies

Then, we find them – Waterlilies in a Brooke dam, glowing in the early morning light…

Lin Barrie photo, Waterlilies in the Brooke”

So I will be in Harare with Kelli for a few weeks helping her and talented Rutendo Karikoga to paint the massage room mural at the Cancer Centre. Starting on Monday, we will develop a water lily and dragonfly theme …

Rutendo’s paintings are accomplished and deeply evocative – abstract expressions of emotion so powerful that I can not wait to see her in action.

Rutendo Karikoga, abstract

Kelli’s paintings reflect intense nature and mood in a healing process, studied abstractions of emotion… her artworks are maturing, powerful and evolving, and I am so excited to share in what she brings to this project…

Kelli Barker, small work, 20 x 20 cm

Think Pink!

Kelli Barker, “Think Pink”, acrylic on stretched canvas, 50 x 50 cm


Here below is a mood board, to give you a feeling of what Debi, Sophie, Kelli, Ru and I have discussed for the massage room….water, waterlilies and dragonflies. And deeply inspired by Dulux’s “Bright Skies” – a calm and reflective colour of the year, for us to dream into. Thank you, Dulux Zimbabwe, for donating paints and Electrosales for donating the hardware to paint with!

Bear in mind that, since three very individual artists will come together and create something spontaneous, the finished walls and ceiling may not look like this at all, but will certainly reflect our hopes and dreams!

MOOD BOARD

Mmmmm.. thinking dragonflies, those symbols of hope and luck in so many countries myths and beliefs…

My dear friend, Master wire and recycling artist Johnson Zuze, creates creatures with such presence that you can feel their thoughts, and believe you inhabit their world completely – such as this masterful yet whimsical dragonfly which alights in my garden – I want to paint like this- maybe this dragonfly will translate to the walls of the massage room!!

Dragonfly by Johnson Zuze

The fantastic beast’s thorax glows with jewel like recycled objects – and Oh …the eyes! Johnson’s visionary use of nespresso pods create large, multifaceted, compound eyes- so expressive !

Johnson Zuze – dragonfly- Johnson’s visionary use of nespresso pods create large, multifaceted, compound eyes-

And more fabulous inspiration by my friend and master metal worker, James Suraji, whose dragonfly shapes entrance me..and which have great meaning for Rutendo, who is on her own ‘dragonfly journey’

James Suraji dragonfly

Impressionist artist Monet was the ultimate master of water, reflected ‘bright skies’ and waterlilies, so he is a strong inspiration for us…..

Monet, “waterlilies”

The white waterlilies of Tembweharta Pan in Gonarezhou, near Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge , (seen also in my photograph in the mood board)….

Lin Barrie photograph, Tembweharta Pan, and lilies… Gonarezhou

Tembweharta waterlilies inspired these large paintings of mine below when camping at Mahove Tented Camp a few years ago. The pans behind that delightful camp on the Runde River were also filled with waterfowl, kingfishers and myriads of these white beauties…

Lin Barrie, “White Waterlilies” (diptych), acrylic on loose canvas, 90 x 130 cm each panel, with Dulux Colour of the Year, “Bright Skies”


So, my own paintings of waterlilies are certainly a stepping off point in my own mind…

Lin Barrie, ”Waterlilies” , acrylic on canvas 94 x 104 cm

But only a stepping off point….I can’t wait to see what Rutendo, Kelli and I actually create on the walls of the massage room, allowing for serendipity, happy accidents, possible wrong turnings, all of which will teach us and lead in the end to the right way…. each day the walls will grow, in probably unexpected ways, and that is the joy of creating.

Rutendo Karikoga, poem ”bright skies”

So, watch this space as the blog grows day by day with our artistic endeavours….!

Lin Barrie stirring Bright Skies

the paint colours are seductive…..

…we begin to paint

Rutendo (‘Ru’)

Teamwork is everything

Debi Jeans our fearless leader and her daughter Rachel attack the ceiling – bright skies all the way!!!

Debi and Rachel
Ru Kelli and Lin

Time to meditate –

Kelli

at last a finished massage room ….

Debi and Lin
a job well done Alex and Ru- and poetry to dream on- thank you sweet friend snd fellow creative, Ru

I have completed a large painting if that inspiring Moonflower seen and smelt on my daily walks – (and inspired hugely by my muse Georgia O’Keefe)… seen here in the exciting new creative showroom that Dulux Zimbabwe has created in Harare. more blogs on this Dulux collaboration to follow! Their company ethos, ”to do good”, truly resonates with me. Bright Skies indeed…

Posted in abstract art, Africa, African child, African flora, african wildlife, art, art collaboration, art exhibition, beauty, bio diversity, buildings, cancer, cityscape art, clouds, colour of the year, Colour of the YearYear, community, culture, Design, Dky, drawing, dreams, dulux, Dulux Zimbabwe, ecosystem, environment, family, flowers, gardens and flowers, Harare, insects, interior decor, interior design, landscape, landscapes, lifestyle, lin barrie, Lin Barrie Art, Lin Barrie publication, love, make up artist, media, murals, New Year, night Sky, paintings, Rain, rains, re-cycled art, re-cycled products, recycled art, Rivers, sculpture, sketching, sky, skyscape, soft furnishings, street art, sunrise, Uncategorized, virtual art exhibition, wall art, wall murals, Walloaint, Wallpaint, Weather, wetland, wetlands, wilderness, wildlife, zimbabwe, Zimbabwe artists | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Sunrise and Egrets; Memories of the Old Year, Hopes for the New Year….

Hope, Serenity, Love, Family, Grace and Faith, all these we take in part from the old year past, and transition into the new year ahead….

Day by Day all we can do is learn from the tough lessons life throws at us and appreciate the beauty all around us.

So, here’s my painting in celebration of Hope! …. my reflections on taking Flight!

Lin Barrie, “Sunrise and Egrets”, acrylc on stretched canvas, 78 x 165 cm 

Lin Barrie, “Sunrise and Egrets”, acrylic on stretched canvas, 78 x 165 cm 

This painting arose from a winter walk that Kelli and I took early one morning in 2021, through the misty cold fairways of the Borrowdale Brooke. 

dew dripping from Phoenix reclinata leaves

The large dam below the Borrowdale Brooke clubhouse reflected stunning wintery clouds

At the dam, stunning wintery clouds

offering pink refuge to hundreds of egrets…

Egrets at dawn, taking flight….

That view of course sat gentle in my mind for the rest of the year of 2021, until a painting recently happened!……

Detail from “Sunrise and Egrets”

The resident family of Egyptian geese sailed through golden light in front of us as we walked, (who needs a goose that lays a golden egg when we have these beauties every day?!)……,

golden geese!

They had many goslings during winter, and were a delight to watch.

(We counted recently on a walk that they had reared more than half of those to nearly full size…a good job of parenting)!

Waterlilies glowed as we walked on and the sun rose

lending me with more painting inspiration… “Waterlilies”, acrylic on loose canvas, 94 x 104 cm

Lin Barrie, “Waterlilies”, acrylic on loose canvas, 94 x 104 cm

Sunrise, waterbirds and of course waterlilies made up an ethereal start to our day on that winters day, memories to treasure …

…and now the painting hangs in the entrance to the Golf Club

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

African Wild Dogs in my Back Garden; Circles of Life

Lycaon pictus; African Wild Dogs in my back garden…. by Lin Barrie

Location: at our bush house, ‘Tsavene’, Save Valley Conservancy, Zimbabwe. 

Date: September 28th, 2021

As Clive and I sat quietly watching the orange African sunset, suddenly an impala doe leaped past us, below the high verandah we sat on. 

She bounced high in the air, kicking backwards and we knew – something was coming….

At the same time our two resident klipspringers erupted past us on the higher rock, dashing for cover- something was indeed coming! …

A wild dog appeared out of nowhere, a streak of lightening as she leaped high and gripped the impala doe. 

The two tumbled together, gold tan and black tumbling in the dust, and immediately two more wild dogs bounded in and, with a brief bellow the impala doe rapidly became their supper.  

Lin Barrie, “Wild Dogs Hunting”, mixed media on loose canvas, 106 x 179 cm

Stomach contents stripped out and left on the side, the dogs ate fast; twenty minutes and the three very full dogs had finished all the meat. 

Sated, they began halfheartedly chewing bones, and tugging the twisted carcass between them as night started to close in… 

Resting between tugging at the bones, they played halfheartedly, too full to move much! 

Lin Barrie, “Wild Dogs Playing”, mixed media acrylic and pencil on loose canvas, 106 x 179 cm

After drinking at our waterhole, they faded into the dusk, leaving the impala skeleton and the stomach behind.

Their haunting Hoo calls drifted through the African night as they connected somewhere out there in the African night with the rest of their pack.

Perhaps their full bellies enabled them to regurgitate for any half grown wild dog pups waiting out in the mopani woodland that might have needed a meal!

Lin Barrie, “Three Pups”, acrylic on stretched canvas, 2 x 2 feet

Later that night, as I worked late in my art studio,  I heard spotted hyenas outside chatting and mumbling over the carcass- the stomach must have been a real find for them, (especially as we know there is a hyena den near our house that they constantly use, and any pups would have benefitted greatly by the gift of a tasty impala meal…)! 

Lin Barrie Spotted Hyena and cub

The next morning our resident band of merry men, the tiny dwarf mongooses, came ranging through, and although the impala skeleton had disappeared, (carried away by the hyenas I presume),  I saw many of the dwarf mongooses deliberately foraging amongst the shards of bones and meat fragments. 

Very interestingly, shortly thereafter in flew our southern ground hornbill family, two adults and two sub adults, (one younger, one older subadult). They started exploring and soon found the kill zone. Whether they “smelt” the meat fragments left here and there on the ground (?)..,or whether they happened upon the bone and meat titbits by chance, we don’t know, but we watched them deliberately forage around the area. The youngest chick begged constantly and loudly, and I saw an adult pick up a dangling meaty morsel and feed it to the delighted youngster.

Lin Barrie, “Hornbills I”, acrylic on loose canvas, 104 x 179 cm

Eat and be eaten, the fascinating Circle of Life…how many other creatures benefit from a predators kill, how many mothers’ babies get fed…..

Posted in Africa, africa, African child, African Safari, African wild dogs, african wildlife, african wildlife conservation fund, arid areas, art, beauty, bio diversity, birding, birds, bush camps, citizen science, conservation, conservation education, conservation news, conservation publication, Cycle of Life, dogs, drawing, eco-tourism, ecosystem, endangered species, environment, family, flight, food, gardens, great limpopo transfrontier conservation Area, landscape, landscapes, Life Drawing, lin barrie, Lin Barrie Art, Lin Barrie publication, lowveld, mopani trees, painted dog conservation, Painted Dogs, painted Dogs, Painted Wolf Foundation, Painted Wolf Wines, painted wolves, paintings, predators, prey, pups, rewilding, safari, SAVE, Save Valley Conservancy, Senuko, sketching, sunset, trees, virtual art exhibition, wild dogs, wilderness, wildlife, wolves, zimbabwe, Zimbabwe artists, Zimbabwe National Parks, Zimbabwean Artist, zimbabweanart | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Baobab Christmas Tree; Rainy Season in the Lowveld

Our wire sculpture Christmas tree is a baobab

Every year we take it down off out mantelpiece where it lives with my wild dog sculpture and the grandchildren decorate it with homegrown ornaments

Our wire sculpture Christmas tree is a baobab
the decorators

and out in the veld bloom these spectacular crinum lilies- constant inspiration for my art

Save Valley Conservancy

The fair lilies are chaperoned by the ”Talking Head” – my favourite granite rock outcrop – a monumental stone sculpture with epic presence who looms over all…

Crinums diptych
Acrylic on canvas
Each is 75 x 50 cm
detail from my painting
Posted in Africa, africa, African child, African flora, African Plant Hunter, african trees, art, beauty, christmas, Christmas tree, ecosystem, flowers, gardens and flowers, landscape, lin barrie, Lin Barrie Art, lowveld, Painted Dogs, painted wolves, paintings, photography, Rainy. Season, re-cycled products, Save Valley Conservancy, sculpture, tree decoration, Uncategorized, wild dogs, wilderness, wood sculpture, zimbabwe, Zimbabwe artists, zimbabweanart | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I bless the rains down in Africa; Baobabs, Beauty and Baubles in Zimbabwe; 

Travellers and residents of Africa, we are all familiar with the iconic ‘upside down tree”, the iconic baobab of Africa which stands much of the year bare and sculptural against the clear winter sky in Zimbabwe.

Its branches twist and turn in the dry air, despairing roots seeking moisture; the thirsty supplications of a gothic giant princess from a Grimms Fairy tale….

Baobab.

Ponderous leafless princess

with advance guard of thorns 

to slow the march of time. 

She slumbers 

awaiting a kiss 

from the first rain.

Lin Barrie 2021

Much as I love sketching and painting this stark dry tracery of branches beneath the cloudless skies of our Zimbabwean lowveld winters, I bless the promise of a wet summer.

Before the rainy season even truly begins, the baobabs pull resources from deep within themselves and spring into fresh green leaves, palm-shaped and joyous in anticipation of cloudy skies as they drop to the ground at our Tsavene house in the Save Valley Conservancy.

Adansonia digitata leaf and stamens…

Starry starry nights are ours as baobabs shyly explode their bounty of frilly white flowers in the darkness of the African night, dancing to beetle song, brushed by bats’ wings….

Baobabs are my icons, representative of all that I love in the wilderness. Providing sustenance and shelter to a myriad creatures, including man, they are icons of the ecosystems of birth and growth and death all around me.

Their tracery of branches and baubles of buds, flowers and then pods are all the decoration a naturally festive tree needs! Pure and joyous inspiration for my artworks.

Zimbabwean storytellers, dreamers, poets, artists, and craftspeople embrace the baobab.

I collect the wonderful wire baobabs that are sold on the side of the road. These wire trees grace my home and many tourism lodges such as Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge, all year round.

In the festive season we merely add more beaded baubles…….

I see baobab flower imagery everywhere…

On the edge of Gonarezhou National Park, Mahenye Village hut paintings seem to celebrate the shape of this beauty…

I bless the rains down in Africa….

The first smatterings of fat drops that escape their prison of cloud and hit the dry red earth waft an unforgettable scent into the air. Redolent of herbs, bare earth and dusty sunsets, this smell is called ‘petrichor’ and of course can be smelt worldwide with the first rains on thirsty earth, but it seems nowhere more powerful, more nostalgic , more sweet, than here on our own home ground!

A season of rain, renewal and hopefully abundance is our hot hot summertime in Zimbabwe, A time of flowers, butterflies and crops growing in the ground.

I bless the rain down in Africa…
I bless the rains down in Africa…

Christmas, the festive holidays, bring families together in normal times, but in these covid times travel is restricted and many families have to rely on photographs, shared memories and messages to be together. Handmade baubles that I have posted to far-flung family grace their Christmas trees worldwide every year.

I have a treasured wire baobab that sits in our lounge year round, and at Christmas the children decorate it with the knitted Gogo Olive animals and beaded embroidered ornaments that I have collected over years…

Our house is a place of memories, of nurturing. Baobab stained glass windows and baobab muesli if you want to eat healthy….

The rains of Africa have brought us a green horizon, a midsummer night’s dream of hope, renewal and future plans… accompanied by Jackie’s handmade fruit mince tarts of course….

A time to celebrate the festive season and the coming New Year…..

New starts, resolutions, and letting go the old….

Africa!

I hear the drums echoing tonight
But she hears only whispers of some quiet conversation
She’s coming in, 12:30 flight
The moonlit wings reflect the stars that guide me towards salvation
I stopped an old man along the way
Hoping to find some old forgotten words or ancient melodies
He turned to me as if to say
“Hurry boy, it’s waiting there for you”It’s gonna take a lot to drag me away from you
There’s nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do
I bless the rains down in Africa
Gonna take some time to do the things we never had (ooh, ooh)The wild dogs cry out in the night
As they grow restless, longing for some solitary company
I know that I must do what’s right
As sure as Kilimanjaro rises like Olympus above the Serengeti
I seek to cure what’s deep inside, frightened of this thing that I’ve becomeIt’s gonna take a lot to drag me away from you
There’s nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do
I bless the rains down in Africa
Gonna take some time to do the things we never had (ooh, ooh)Hurry boy, she’s waiting there for youIt’s gonna take a lot to drag me away from you
There’s nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do
I bless the rains down in Africa
I bless the rains down in Africa
(I bless the rain)
I bless the rains down in Africa 
I bless the rains down in Africa
I bless the rains down in Africa 
(Gonna take the time)
Gonna take some time to do the things we never had (ooh, ooh)

Posted in abstract art, adventure travel, Africa, africa, African child, African flora, African Plant Hunter, African Safari, african trees, african wildlife, arid areas, art, baobab, beauty, bio diversity, bush camps, butterflies, Changana people, Chilo Gorge Safari Lodge, christmas, Christmas tree, citizen science, climate change, clive stockil, community, conservation, crafts, cultural beliefs, culture, Design, dreams, eco-tourism, ecosystem, edible plant, endangered species, environment, fairytale, family, festive season, flowers, food, food culture, Friendship, gardens, gardens and flowers, gonarezhou national park, Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, Hogmanay, home grown food, homegrown, interior decor, interior design, landscapes, Lin Barrie Art, Lin Barrie publication, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Sketch for Survival and COP26; Art and Climate Concerns go hand in hand…

Sketch for Survival is a global art initiative in aid of conservation.

I am thrilled to be a part if it, with my sketches of African wild dogs, Lycaon pictus- an endangered predator which nevertheless is doing well in Zimbabwe within the Save valley Conservancy , Malilangwe and Gonarezhou National Park, plus the other wilderness reserves of Mana, Hwange and Matusadona, in Zimbabwe. African Wildlife Conservation Fund and Painted Dog Conservation do an essential and efficient job within Zimbabwe, of monitoring, intervention snd education outreach for these charismatic wild dogs (aka Painted Wolves, Painted Dogs)

The collection celebrates the beauty and colour of the natural world while also raising awareness about the threats facing it, including those posed by human activity. Original artworks, from oils and watercolours to sketches and street art,  feature endangered species and at-risk wild spaces. All artwork donated to Sketch for Survival is available to purchase either through our online fundraising auction in November or in our Affordable Art Gallery. ALL PROCEEDS support our projects.

We organise a number of creative initiatives to highlight the threats facing iconic species and their habitats, while also raising vital funds to help protect them. 

We’ve found art and photography to be incredibly effective vehicles for communicating about tough topics ranging from illegal wildlife crime to climate change.

When someone visits one of our exhibitions and learns that every single species or wild space pictured is threatened, and why – usually down to human activity – it has considerable impact.

SKETCH COLLECTION

A central theme of Sketch for Survival is that time is running out. The world must take action to avoid catastrophic consequences. To amplify this message our Sketch for Survival collection includes 26-minute sketches.

In stark contrast to time-consuming, complex studio artworks, the raw beauty of a sketch provides an important visual cue:  reminding us that we have limited time to get the job done. Our sketches also remind us of the shocking statistic at the heart of our campaign:

In the wild, an African elephant is lost every 26 minutes on average due to poaching.

This year’s sketch collection includes artwork kindly donated by professional artists and celebrity supporters including Karen Laurence Rowe, Lin Barrie, Jonathan Truss, Alison Nicholls, David Rankin, Hazel Sloan, Levison Wood, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Stephen Fry.

Lin Barrie, ”Lycaon pictus”, Monotype, acrylic on paper, each A2 size
Lin Barrie, ”Lycaon pictus”, Monotype, acrylic on paper, each A2 size

The Sketch for Survival Exhibition Collection is auctioned on 28 November this year following our exhibition tour which includes gallery@oxo on London’s South Bank.  ALL PROCEEDS from the sale of art support 21 projects.

auction – https://explorersagainstextinction.irostrum.com/

I am thrilled! A print of the artwork I donated to Sketch for Survival 2021 is on display at COP26 , in the VIP Lounge Area!

Explorers Against Extinction was selected as one of only 15 organisations worldwide allowed to display in the Blue zone of COP26. 
Its a huge honour to be part of representing Explorers Against Extinction projects at such a vital event – proof that by coming together for ecosystem and climate campaigns, we can have a collective voice on the biggest stage.

The COP26 VIP lounge display features 5 A0 prints of artworks from this year’s collection.

Posted in #explorers against extinction, #glasgow, abstract art, Africa, africa, African flora, African wild dogs, african wildlife, animal rights, anti poaching, arid areas, art, art collaboration, art exhibition, art gallery, art video, bio diversity, climate change, community conservation, conservation, conservation education, conservation news, COP26, eco-tourism, ecosystem, education, endangered, endangered species, Floods, food culture, Gonarezhou Conservation Trust, gonarezhou national park, Hwange, landscape, landscapes, lin barrie, Lin Barrie Art, Lin Barrie publication, Painted Dogs, painted Dogs, Painted Wolf Foundation, Painted Wolf Wines, painted wolves, paintings, predators, prey, rabies, rewilding, Rivers, Save Valley Conservancy, Scotland, sketch for survival, sketching, travel, trees, Uncategorized, virtual art exhibition, wall art, wild dogs, wilderness, wildlife, wildlife trade, wolves, zimbabwe, Zimbabwe artists, Zimbabwean Artist | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment